Love God and Light a Fire for the Sake of His People

Homily for 30th Sunday in Ordinary Time (Year A)
October 29, 2017
Holy Trinity, Tabor – 8:00 AM; St. Francis of Assisi, Fisher – 10:00 AM

Focus:              God loves his people.
Function:         Love God and Light a Fire for the sake of his people.


Recently, I have been reading a very good book by Fr. Thomas Dubay. The book is called Deep Conversion Deep Prayer.  The book is about how a deeper prayer life leads to deeper conversion, and how deeper conversion leads to a deeper prayer life.

At the beginning of the book, Fr. Dubay introduces us to Saint Bernard of Clairvaux, a man who lived in the 1100s. St. Bernard is a saintly hero of mine – I greatly admire him for his preaching ability.  When he was 20 years old, he entered a monastery, which is remarkable in itself.  What is extraordinary is that he brought 20 other young men with him.

Eventually Bernard was elected as the abbot of his monastery. In one of his conferences to his monks, he said this:

There are more people converted from mortal sin to grace, than there are religious people converted from good to better.

Fr. Dubay echoes this point, but he goes on further to state that this is true of people in all states of life. It is true of priests, married people, religious people, and single people.  It is true of all of us.

There are more people converted from mortal sin to grace, than there are religious people converted from good to better.

In other words, there are more people who give up serious alienation from God then there are people who give up small wrongs or willed venial sins. And there are even fewer who grow in heroic virtue and live as saints live.[i]

There are more people who go from bad to good than there are people who go from good to better and better to best.

There are more people who repent and believe in the Gospel than there are people who seek to love God with their whole mind, heart, soul, and strength and their neighbor as themselves.

People will give up serious sin but they will stop at pursuing holiness. They will work to overcome vice but they will stop a pursuing virtue.

There are more people converted from mortal sin to grace, than there are religious people converted from good to better.

Of course, we are called to more than simply giving up sin. We are called to love.  Sin stands in the way of our ability to love so we must give up sin.  But to merely give up sin without progressing in love is to give up on the journey after we’ve packed the car and pulled out of the driveway.

Brothers and sisters, we are called to more. We are called to so much more.

We are called to love.

We are called to love with a heroic love.

We are called to love the One who first loved us with a love so strong that it called us into our very existence. We are called to love Him with all that we have and are because He first loved us.

Can we do it?

We can, with God’s help. And what’s more, it’s what we’re called to.  It’s who we’re called to be.

You shall love the Lord, your God, with all your heart, with all your soul, and with all your mind. This is the greatest and first commandment.  The second is like it: You shall love your neighbor as yourself.  The whole law and the prophets depend on these two commandments.

Brothers and sisters, outside of the context of freeing us to love, the other commandments make no sense. We can fulfill the letter of the law when it comes to the other commandments but if our motivation is something other than to grow in our ability to love, then we are missing the mark.

In another place, Jesus said:

You have heard it said that You Shall Not Commit Adultery. But I say to you, whoever looks at another with lust has already committed adultery with her in his heart.

If we merely fulfill the letter of the law but miss the spirit of the law, we are missing the point. If we look at another lustfully but stop short of committing the act of adultery, we are missing the point.

We are called to more. We are called to so much more.  We are called to love.

The whole law and the prophets depend on these two commandments. To love God with everything we have, and to love our neighbor as ourselves.

How are you doing?

Do you love God with all you’ve got?

Where do you compromise?

Where do you make excuses to sin?

There are more people converted from mortal sin to grace, than there are religious people converted from good to better.

Where do you stop short of conversion?

John Henry Newman was an Anglican priest who lived in the 1800s. He converted to Catholicism and later became a cardinal.  Fr. Dubay noted that Newman made this observation:

[L]arge groups of people, even large groups of religiously-minded people, do not light fires. Throughout the Church’s twenty centuries of history, it is individuals who ignite the blazes…Government bodies, town hall meetings, boards of directors on occasion promote worthy projects and programs…but these groups seldom, if ever, do anything that looks like [a huge fire].  If the group is blessed to have a saint in its midst, something great may happen–unless the group manages to thwart even a saint with majority mediocrity.  It is men and women like Augustine, Chrysostom, Benedict, Bernard, Francis, Dominic, Catherine, Thomas, Ignatius, Teresa of Avila, John of the Cross, John Vianney and Therese of Lisieux who light fires.  The evidence is convincing.

The glories of Church history are chiefly the works of individuals who, themselves bursting with love and intimacy with the Trinity, spark others to imitate their burning love, their [greatness of soul] and their heroicity in all the virtues. At the same time it is their deep love intimacy with the Lord that is the taproot of their ability to heal human hurts.[ii]

Brothers and sisters, the Lord came to cast a fire on the earth. He came to ignite a fire – the fire of charity.  The fire has been lit.  Will you catch fire and illumine the darkness so that others will catch fire from you?  Will you help spread it?

Become who you were meant to be and you will set the world on fire.
Put the law of love into practice and you will set the world on fire.

The two great commandments go together. They cannot be separated.  Love of God with all you’ve got will lead to love of neighbor, because you cannot love God with all you’ve got without loving what God loves with all you’ve got.  And God infinitely loves you and the person sitting next to you.

October is Respect Life Month.
Today is Life and Dignity Sunday.

Today provides you with a small opportunity to take a step toward conversion. To take a step toward loving God and loving your neighbor.  Today provides you with an opportunity to be converted from good to better.


MCC
In your pews are cards to sign up for the Catholic Advocacy Network. This network is run by the Minnesota Catholic Conference of Bishops.  It provides a way for you to stay informed of current legislation of interest to Catholics in Minnesota – legislation that has the potential to help or harm your brothers and sisters right here at home.

 

You may be tempted to say, “I don’t care. I don’t need another email.  I don’t want to be involved.”

I would remind you of this. God cares.  And for that reason, so should you.  God loves you infinitely.  He loves your children infinitely.  He loves your neighbor infinitely.  And he calls you to love them as you love yourself.  Love doesn’t stand idly by.

You shall love the Lord, your God with all your heart, with all your soul, and with all your mind. This is the greatest and first commandment.  The second is like it: You shall love your neighbor as yourself.  The whole law and the prophets depend on these two commandments.

Take a step toward deeper conversion today.
Take a step toward becoming a saint.
Take a step toward loving more deeply.
Take a step toward setting the world on fire.


[i] Fr. Thomas Dubay, Deep Conversion Deep Prayer, p. 12.
[ii] Ibid., p. 74.

You Belong to God

Homily for 29th Sunday in Ordinary Time (Year A)
October 21-22, 2017
Sacred Heart, EGF – 5:00 PM
Holy Trinity, Tabor – 8:00 AM; St. Francis of Assisi, Fisher – 10:00 AM

Focus:               You Belong to God.
Function:         Give Yourself to God.


Repay to Caesar what belongs to Caesar, and repay to God what belongs to God.

What belonged to Caesar?

Matters of state.
Care for the population.
The taxes to be paid by the coin that bore his image.

What belongs to God?

Everything. All of creation.
Glory and Honor, according to the Psalm response for this Mass (Ps 96: “Give the Lord Glory and Honor”).
Most especially, the coin that bears his image.

What is this coin that bears the image of God?

You are.

In the beginning He created them, in the divine image he created them, male and female he created them.

You are made in the image and likeness of God.  Through your baptism, the likeness of God that had been lost through the original sin was restored to you.

You are made in the image and likeness of God.  You bear his image in the world.

Repay to God what belongs to God.

In other words, give yourself to him.

St. Irenaeus, an early Church Father, said this: The Glory of God is Man Fully Alive.
The responsorial psalm for this Mass exhorts us to Give the Lord Glory and Honor.
Jesus says to Repay to God what belongs to God.

So, if we are to repay to God what belongs to God, then we must become fully alive in Christ.  The disciple who is fully alive in Christ gives glory and honor to God.

The person who goes above and beyond,
who pursues excellence and virtue,
who pushes the limits of a charity which knows no limits,
who strives for greatness…
This person gives glory and honor to God.

The person who strives to love rather than to merely fulfill the requirements of the law,
to shoot for the stars rather than figure out the bare minimum to be done,
to sacrifice for the good of others instead of flying under the radar…
This person gives glory and honor to God.

The person who asks not “How hard do I have to work” but rather “What am I capable of?” This person gives glory and honor to God.

The person who seeks to love like Jesus loves,
setting their heart ablaze with the fire of a charity that cannot be contained more than they try to merely avoid sinning…
This person gives glory and honor to God.

We’ve all known people like this in our lives. We’ve experienced the Glory of God
in people who have inspired us, in disciples whose example, whose witness, whose often silent witness, calls and challenges us to be the best that we can be. They call the best out of us.  They inspire it out of us.

They don’t take the easy way out.
They challenge themselves.
They surround themselves with others whose witness challenges them.
They are willing to challenge others to be the best that they can be.
They live the truth of the Gospel without compromise.
They don’t complain.
They are joyful.
They don’t look to their own interests but look to the interests of others.
They love.

And the image of God can be seen clearly in them.

The image of God in them isn’t obscured by selfishness, covered over by negativity, or buried in the mire of vices and sins. Not that they don’t have sins and vices, but they constantly work to overcome them, picking themselves out of the gutter when they find themselves there and returning to the Lord in prayer and the sacraments so that he can polish them, making them shine as they bear his image ever more clearly to a world in need.

In a word, they give glory to God because they pursue one thing: holiness. They strive to be holy.  They abandon themselves to the God whose love is a living flame, and they allow his love to burn away the sins and vices that cover his image in them.  They look to Christ whose image they are to bear and they strive to conform their wills to His, to become an icon, an image, of Jesus Christ in the world.  They die to themselves and allow themselves to be transformed by Christ, to be transformed into another Christ.

CS Lewis described these people in his book Mere Christianity:

Already the new men are dotted here and there all over the earth. Some, as I have admitted, are still hardly recognizable: but others can be recognized. Every now and then one meets them. Their very voices and faces are different from ours: stronger, quieter, happier, more radiant. They begin where most of us leave off. They are, I say, recognizable; but you must know what to look for. They will not be very like the idea of ‘religious people’ which you have formed from your general reading. They do not draw attention to themselves. You tend to think that you are being kind to them when they are really being kind to you. They love you more than other men do, but they need you less. They will usually seem to have a lot of time: you will wonder where it comes from. When you have recognized one of them, you will recognize the next one much more easily. And I strongly suspect that they recognize one another immediately and infallibly, across every barrier of color, sex, class, age, and even of creeds. In that way, to become holy is rather like joining a secret society. To put it at the very lowest, it must be great fun.

Brothers and sisters, you are made in the image and likeness of God.
You bear his image.
You belong to him.

The Glory of God is man fully alive.

Become what you were meant to be.
Become fully alive in the Spirit and give yourself to Him.
Become fully alive in the Spirit by giving yourself to Him.

Give Him glory and honor.

Repay to God what belongs to God.

And at the end, on that day when Jesus looks at you and says “Show me the coin”, all will know to whom you belong because they will clearly see Whose Image you bear.

The Feast is Ready

Homily for 28th Sunday in Ordinary Time (Year A)
October 15, 2017
Sacred Heart, EGF – 7:30 AM; 9:00 AM; 10:30 AM

Focus:               The Feast is Ready.
Function:          Come Hungry.


Thanksgiving dinner.jpgWhen I was in high school, I worked for a Kmart store. All of us were expected to work on Thanksgiving Day since it was such a big shopping day, but they would always try to schedule the shifts in such a way as to allow as many of us as possible to enjoy Thanksgiving Dinner with our families.

Still, no one cares for working on Thanksgiving. To make it more enjoyable and to create some excitement, the store always catered in an early Thanksgiving lunch.  Turkey, mashed potatoes and gravy, corn, cranberry…

When it was my turn for a break, I went back to the lounge and got a plate. I had been up early and was hungry.  It smelled so good!  I enjoyed lunch with some of my friends and then went back to work for another hour to finish my shift.

When I got home, the yard was filled with cars. I walked in the house and was greeted by my mom and dad, aunts, uncles and cousins.  They had been waiting for me.  We prayed and everyone started going through the line.  I hung toward the back.

“Matt, grab a plate!” my mom said.

This wasn’t going to go over well…

I had so filled myself with the catered meal at work that I had no appetite for the home-cooked feast that my mom had prepared…I’ll never forget how her face fell as she exclaimed: “I can’t believe you did that!”

Brothers and sisters, today’s readings remind us that the Lord has prepared a feast for us…an abundant feast of rich foods and choice wines. We are called to the supper of the Lamb.  Yet, so often, we fill ourselves with other foods and kill our appetite for the feast that the Lord has prepared.

We fill ourselves with the fast food of pleasure and instant gratification so that we no longer hunger for the banquet of Christ’s love.

But Christ calls us to something more.

Christ calls us to the Banquet.

And he calls us to go into the main roads and invite to the feast whomever we find. Bring them in so that they may feed on banquet that will satisfy every hunger of the human heart.

Some declined the invitation to the Wedding Feast. They declined it because weren’t hungry for it.  They had filled themselves with other things, things that seemed to satisfy but in the end would only leave them hungry again.

Others jumped at the invitation to the Feast and gladly accepted, but they took it for granted. They came to the Feast but they spurned the King by coming in unprepared.

They came to the feast but did not robe themselves with repentance.

They came to the feast but failed to clothe themselves with the garment of gratitude, the clothes of conversion, preferring instead the soiled clothes of an unmoved heart. They treated the special wedding feast as if it were a quick lunch break at a fast food restaurant, and they offended the king.

Brothers and sisters, the feast is ready.

The fatted calf has been killed.
Everything is ready.

Come to the feast.

Come to the feast and receive the food that satisfies the hungers of the heart.

Come to the feast and receive the Living Bread come down from Heaven – the bread that is the flesh for the life of the world.

Come to the feast and taste a wine that is rich and full-bodied, a foretaste and sample of the good wine we all hope to experience one day at the Wedding Feast of Heaven, a sober intoxication of the Spirit of God himself.

Come to the feast.

Come hungry.

This is why the Church requires us to fast an hour before receiving the Eucharist. We fast from the food that doesn’t satisfy in order to increase our desire for the food that ultimately satisfies…

The Bread of Life and the Chalice of Salvation…
A Body broken and Blood outpoured…

Come to the feast.

Come with your wedding garment, come clothed in the white garment that was given to you by the King at your baptism, the white garment that is the outward sign of your Christian dignity, the garment that you were urged to bring unstained into the wedding feast, a garment that so often gets soiled by the sin of our daily living but thanks be to God the garment that is also able to be washed white again by the Blood of the Lamb in the confessional.

This is why we are to confess any serious sins, any mortal sins, before we receive Holy Communion, so that we may enter the feast clothed in our wedding garment, so that we may partake of the banquet with hearts contrite and spirits humble.

God provides all that we need.

God is the one who provides the banquet.
God is the one who prepares the feast.
God is the one who provides the garment.

God is the one who has invited us, called us, chosen us.

Blessed are those who are called to the supper of the Lamb.

Brothers and sisters, everything is ready.
The invitation has been extended:
“Come to the feast.”
“Come hungry.”

Bear Fruit That Will Remain

Homily for 27th Sunday in Ordinary Time (Year A)
October 7-8, 2017
Sacred Heart, EGF – 5:00 PM
Holy Trinity, Tabor – 8:00 AM; St. Francis of Assisi, Fisher – 10:00 AM

Focus:             He has chosen you to bear fruit.
Function:       Bear fruit that will remain.


vineyard

We’ve been hearing a lot about vineyards over the past couple of weeks.

Two weeks ago, we heard the story of the landowner who went out at various hours of the day to hire laborers to work in his vineyard. He went out at 6:00, 9:00, noon, 3:00, and 5:00 and hired laborers to work in his vineyard. “Go into my vineyard”, he told them. He gave them what, in his eyes, was just, although the laborers who were hired early in the day did not feel it was fair, even though most of them received more than they could have hoped for.

Last week, we heard the story of the Father who told his two sons: “Go and work in my vineyard today.” One said “I will not” but changed his mind and went. The other said “Yes, sir” but did not go.

This week, we hear about more vineyards.

The first reading speaks of how the Lord worked hard to cultivate a vineyard that would bear abundant fruit, but despite all of his efforts, despite all of the grace that he poured upon it, it would not bear fruit. The only thing to be done was to tear it down. This vineyard was compared to the Israelite people – the people whom God had chosen, called out of slavery in Egypt, brought into the Promised Land, and worked countless signs and wonders in their presence so that they would trust Him. They didn’t. They constantly rebelled, they sinned, and they bore bad fruit.

The Gospel, like the first reading, speaks of how the Lord worked hard to cultivate a vineyard that would bear abundant fruit. This time, it does bear fruit, but the tenants in charge of it are greedy and won’t give the landowner the fruit. They work against the landowner. They rebel against him and even kill his son. They wouldn’t share the fruit that the vineyard bore. So the landowner took it away from them.

Brothers and sisters, throughout the pages of history, this story of the vineyard has repeated itself time and time again. The book is now opened to our page. We are given everything we need to bear abundant fruit. Christ calls us to bear abundant fruit.

I have chosen you from the world, says the Lord, to go and bear fruit that will remain.

He has chosen us to bear fruit, and he has equipped us to do so. He equips us with his grace. He gives us the gift of His Spirit, which we receive in Baptism and Confirmation. He calls us to use the gifts of the Holy Spirit to bear fruit.

Saint Paul’s letter to the Galatians tells us that the fruits of the Holy Spirit are love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, generosity, faithfulness, gentleness, and self-control.

If we are responding to the grace that God is pouring upon us at every moment, we will see these fruits abound in our lives. If we aren’t seeing these fruits, perhaps something in our spiritual lives needs to change.

Jesus said, By your fruits you will know them…Every sound tree bears good fruit, but the bad tree bears evil fruit… (MT 7:15-20).

Are you bearing good fruit?

Are you bearing the fruit of love,
love that is more than a feeling,
love that pours itself out in service to others?
If you aren’t experiencing this fruit, consider finding a way to serve others, to make a gift of yourself to others. Don’t just think about it, do it.  You say you don’t have time.  I say that if you make time you will find time, and you will find more than time, you will find love, joy, peace, and happiness…

Are you bearing the fruit of joy,
a joy that abides even amid the stresses that are part of daily living,
a joy that comes from knowing that you are a beloved son or daughter of the Father,
a joy that comes from knowing that your eternal inheritance is in Heaven?
If you aren’t experiencing this fruit, I encourage you to take up the practice of counting your blessings each day. See the gifts that God has given you and your heart will be filled with joy.

Are you bearing the fruit of peace,
a deep peace that is unshakeable even amid the waters of the most turbulent storm,
a peace that comes from spending time in the presence of the Lord?
If you lack peace in your life, consider spending one hour per week in Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament. Come any day during the week and sit before the Tabernacle, or come on Tuesday and gaze upon the Lord while he is enthroned upon this altar – the Lord who said to his apostles “Peace I leave you, my peace I give you.” I promise you it will bear the fruit of peace.

Are you bearing the fruit of patience, a willingness to bear the burdens of another, to put up with another’s foolishness because they are willing to put up with yours?

Is your life marked by the fruits of kindness and gentleness, fruits that grow in lives secure in the strength of their identity as one created, redeemed, and loved by God?

Is your life bearing the fruit of generosity? Would others say you are a generous person? If you want to grow in generosity, take a leap of faith a give heroically of your time, talent, or treasures. Commit to something even if you don’t feel you have the time or money to do so. Ask the Lord to provide for you. He will teach you dependence on him and your generosity will bear abundant fruit.

Is your life marked by the fruit of faithfulness? Do you keep your commitments to God and to the people in your life? If you want to grow in faithfulness, pick a target – an area where you want to be faithful – and ask someone to hold you accountable, to check-in from time to time and ask how you’re doing.

Is your life a life of self-control? Are you a man or woman of temperance, of moderation? If you want to grow in self-control in an area of your life, whether it be anger, food, drink, or sexuality, consider the practice of fasting from something. We have one will – when we deny ourselves in one area of our lives, that strengthens our will to be temperate in other areas of our life. Practice fasting in some area and you will find yourself bearing the fruit of self-control.

I have chosen you from the world, says the Lord, to go and bear fruit that will remain.

He has chosen you to bear fruit that will remain.
By your fruits, you will be known.

Are you bearing good fruit? Or do you need to make a change in your spiritual life?

He gives you all you need.
You are not alone in this.

He gives you the fruit of his very Body and Blood from this altar to strengthen you so that your life can bear abundant fruit.

Blessed are those who are called to the supper of the Lamb.

Today is the Day. Seize the Day.

Homily for 26th Sunday in Ordinary Time (Year A)
September 30 and October 1, 2017
Sacred Heart, EGF – 5:00 PM
Holy Trinity, Tabor – 8:00 AM; St. Francis of Assisi, Fisher: 10:00 AM

Focus:               Today is the day.
Function:         Seize the day!


cats in the cradle

Two sons.
One call.

Two answers.
Two responses.

Son, go out and work in my vineyard today.

“I don’t want to.”
“I do enough already.”
“I’m scared.”
“I have other things to do.”
“I’m too busy.”
“I don’t want to work that hard.”
“Someone else can do it, it’s not my job.”
“Other people can take care of it.”

Son, go out and work in my vineyard today.
I will not.

Two sons.
One call.

Two answers.
Two responses.

Son, go out and work in my vineyard today.

“Sure, Dad, right after this TV show is done.”
“I will Mom, just give me a minute.”
“I will as soon as things slow down at work.”

Son, go out and work in my vineyard today.
Yes, sir.

Brothers and sisters, like the two sons in today’s Gospel, we given the invitation every day to work in the vineyard. What is our response?

Is it the response of the first son, who said “No” but then changed his mind and went?
Or is it the response of the second son, who said “Yes” but never went?

The Lord gives us the invitation to follow him every day. The Lord cares about what we do with today’s invitation.  He’s not interested in what we did with yesterday’s invitation.  He’s interested in what we will do with today’s invitation.

When someone turns away from virtue to commit iniquity, and dies, it is because of the iniquity he committed that he must die.

It is because he gave up his opportunity today. He had the freedom that virtue gives – he had the good habits that he needed and he freely chose to turn away from them to sin.  He failed to seize the day.

But if he turns from the wickedness he has committed, he does what is right and just, he shall preserve his life; since he has turned away from all the sins he has committed.

It is because he worked to overcome his enslavement to sin. His freedom was lacking because of the vice that had him enslaved, and he freely chose to turn away from that sin.  He seized the day.

The Lord extends his invitation every day. He’s not interested in how we’ve responded to the invitation in the past.  He cares about today.

Today is the day.

Today is the day to pray.
Today is the day to serve.
Today is the day to turn off the TV and spend time with your family.
Today is the day to examine your conscience and make a decision to confess your sins if you’ve been putting it off.
Today is the day to make a decision to combat the vice you struggle with by cultivating the opposite virtue.
Today is the day to make a gift of yourself to others.
Today is the day to repent, to turn around, to make a radical change in your life.
Today is the day to not give in, to not give up. Today is the day to continue to seek His grace in times of temptation, to persevere in your pursuit of virtue.

Today is the day you’ve been given.

Today is the day.

Seize the day.

Do not put off until tomorrow what you can do today.
Delay not your conversion to the Lord, put it not off from day to day.

Yesterday is gone. Tomorrow is not yet here.
The only time we have is today. Make the most of it.

I’m reminded of the famous song by Harry Chapin:

My child arrived just the other day
He came to the world in the usual way
But there were planes to catch, and bills to pay
He learned to walk while I was away
And he was talking ‘fore I knew it, and as he grew
He’d say, I’m gonna be like you, dad
You know I’m gonna be like you

And the cat’s in the cradle and the silver spoon
Little boy blue and the man in the moon
When you coming home, dad?
I don’t know when
But we’ll get together then
You know we’ll have a good time then

My son turned ten just the other day
He said, thanks for the ball, dad, come on let’s play
Can you teach me to throw, I said, not today
I got a lot to do, he said, that’s okay
And he walked away, but his smile never dimmed
Said, I’m gonna be like him, yeah
You know I’m gonna be like him

Well, he came from college just the other day
So much like a man I just had to say
Son, I’m proud of you
Can you sit for a while?
He shook his head, and he said with a smile
What I’d really like, dad, is to borrow the car keys
See you later
Can I have them please?

I’ve long since retired and my son’s moved away
I called him up just the other day
I said, I’d like to see you if you don’t mind
He said, I’d love to, dad, if I could find the time
You see, my new job’s a hassle, and the kid’s got the flu
But it’s sure nice talking to you, dad
It’s been sure nice talking to you

And the cat’s in the cradle and the silver spoon
Little boy blue and the man in the moon
When you coming home, son?
I don’t know when
But we’ll get together then
You know we’ll have a good time then

The Lord continually calls us, he invites us, he urges us.

Go and work in my vineyard today.

TODAY, brothers and sisters, today.

Can you hear his call?

Today is the day.

Seize the day.