God Gives the Growth. Scatter the Seed.

Homily for 11th Sunday in Ordinary Time (Year B)
June 12-13, 2021

St. Lawrence, Mentor – Saturday 7:00 PM
Sacred Heart, EGF – Sunday 10:00 AM

Focus:             God gives the growth.
Function:         Scatter the seed.


Every year, Sacred Heart School has different dress up days.  One of the days is Vocation Day.  This year, as it happens every so often, a young boy dressed up as a priest.  At the end of the day, I invited him and his mom to stop by my office.  I gave him one of my collars.  The real deal.  His name was written on the back along with a note that read, “Jesus said, Come follow me.” 

When they got to the car, his little sister wanted to look at it.  He told her, “You can look at it, but be careful, I’m going to be needing that some day!” 

I scattered a seed.  Or, maybe I watered a seed that was already planted.

I don’t know what will come of it. 

Maybe it will get lost. 
Maybe it will end up tucked away in a special box. 
Maybe he will find it someday, years from now. 
He might throw it away when he is 16. 
Then again, he might wear it on his ordination day.

I don’t know what God will do with that seed.
I don’t need to know.

All I need to do is scatter it.

God is the one to make it grow.

I would like to share with you some words entitled Prophets of a Future Not Our Own:[1]

Prophets of a Future Not Our Own:

It helps, now and then, to step back and take a long view.

The kingdom is not only beyond our efforts, it is even beyond our vision.

We accomplish in our lifetime only a tiny fraction of the magnificent enterprise that is God’s work. Nothing we do is complete, which is a way of saying that the Kingdom always lies beyond us.

No statement says all that could be said.

No prayer fully expresses our faith.

No confession brings perfection.

No pastoral visit brings wholeness.

No program accomplishes the Church’s mission.

No set of goals and objectives includes everything.

This is what we are about.

We plant the seeds that one day will grow.

We water seeds already planted, knowing that they hold future promise.

We lay foundations that will need further development.

We provide yeast that produces far beyond our capabilities.

We cannot do everything, and there is a sense of liberation in realizing that.  This enables us to do something, and to do it very well.

It may be incomplete, but it is a beginning, a step along the way, an opportunity for the Lord’s grace to enter and do the rest.

We may never see the end results, but that is the difference between the master builder and the worker.

We are workers, not master builders; ministers, not messiahs.

We are prophets of a future not our own.

This is how it is with the kingdom of God; it is as if a man were to scatter seed on the land and would sleep and rise night and day and through it all the seed would sprout and grow, he knows not how.  Of its own accord the land yields fruit.

What if the man in the parable never scattered the seed?


[1] Bishop Ken Untener, “Prophets of a Future Not Our Own”, https://www.usccb.org/prayer-and-worship/prayers-and-devotions/prayers/prophets-of-a-future-not-our-own

There is Power in the Blood

Homily for Corpus Christi – The Most Holy Body and Blood of Christ (Year B)
June 6, 2021
Holy Trinity, Tabor – 8:00 AM
St. Francis, Fisher – 10:00 AM
Sacred Heart, EGF – 5:00 PM


Today, we celebrate the great feast of Corpus Christi – the Feast of the Body and Blood of Christ.

Today, we also reinstate reception of Holy Communion under both forms.  Today, the chalice returns for the faithful after 15 months.

The Church teaches that,
in receiving Communion under the form of bread alone,
in receiving the host alone,
or in receiving communion under the form of the wine,
a person receives the fullness of the Eucharist, the whole Christ,
Body, Blood, Soul, and Divinity.

At the same time,
the Church also teaches that the fulness of the sign is more perfect when we receive both.

Jesus said, “Take and eat…this is my Body.  Take and drink…this is my Blood.”

It is interesting to me that, in order for a Mass to be a valid Mass, the priest must receive both the Body and the Blood consecrated at that Mass.  He cannot receive just one or the other. 

In light of this day that so many of us have waited for, I would like to reflect today on the Blood of Christ.

There is power in the blood. 

Blood carries the life force of a person.  If a person loses a lot of blood, they grow weak and will soon die.  Lost of blood can equal loss of life.

In such cases, a blood donor is needed.  Blood donors save lives.  The person losing blood is given a blood transfusion and their life is restored.

There is power in the blood.

Cain slew his brother Abel, and God said to him, “Your brother’s blood cries out to me from the ground.”

Pilate washed his hands and told the Jews, “I am innocent of this man’s blood.”

The life of the flesh is in the blood. 

There is power in the blood.

Before the angel of death was sent to go through Egypt, to inflict the final plague by which God would force Pharaoh’s hand to let his people go, the Israelites were to sacrifice a lamb and smear the blood of the lamb on the doorposts of their houses.  Seeing the blood on the doorpost, the angel of death would pass over the house and spare those in it. 

There is power in the blood.

Blood indicates family ties.  Blood is thicker than water, they say.  In some times and cultures, blood brothers are forged by two men cutting the palms of their hands and shaking hands.  They share in the blood and family ties are forged.  Covenants are sealed in blood. 

Today, the Israelites offer holocausts and sacrifices as peace offerings to God.  Moses takes the blood from the sacrifices.  He splashes half on the altar, which represents God.  The other half is sprinkled on the people.  A covenant is made.  Family ties are forged. 

There is power in the blood. 

Take this, all of you, and drink from it. 
For this is the chalice of my blood,
the blood of the new and eternal covenant,
which will be poured out for you and for many for the forgiveness of sins. 
Do this in memory of me.

Christ sheds his blood, his life force, so that our lives might be spared.

There is power in his blood.

His blood anoints our lips at the same time that his blood is presented before the Father in the Holy of Holies that is Heaven, just like it was sprinkled on the people at the same time that it was splashed on the altar, sealing a covenant between God and man.  That covenant is sealed between God and this man or God and this woman in Holy Communion. 

There is power in his blood.

The blood that once anointed the doorposts of the Israelites now anoints the lips of believers, and the angel of death passes over us like he passed over the houses where they were.  Without the shedding of blood, there is no forgiveness of sins.  Ours was the blood that should have been shed but he offered his instead. 

There is power in his blood.

Last month at Sacred Heart School, the juniors had their class retreat.  We had Mass outside at Turtle River State Park.  It was a windy day.  I received communion and proceeded to distribute communion.  Carrying the paten in one hand, and covering it with the other so that the hosts would not blow away, I went to each person and gave them communion.  There were 5 hosts remaining.  I turned back toward the picnic table which served as our altar, consumed the remaining hosts, and then looked up.  That was when I saw him: the altar server.  His face fell.  I had forgotten to give him communion. 

I picked up the chalice that was on the altar, handed it to him, and said, “the Blood of Christ.”

He received a drop.

And that was all he needed. 

One drop of the precious blood of Christ would have been sufficient to redeem the world.

There is power in the blood.